The Center for Clinical Genomics of Microbial Systems (CC-GEMS)

Our Mission:

The mission of the Center for Clinical Genomics of Microbial Systems (CC-GEMS) is to apply next-generation sequencing and related technologies to clinical medicine with materials from patients and/or research subjects. The Center's goal is to generate new information on pathogens, microbiomes, and host-parasite interactions that may lead to an improved understanding of host-microbial interactions and improvements in clinical care. The Center:

  • Provides the WUSM infectious disease community with access to NGS and related technologies
  • Promotes development of novel diagnostic approaches (based on NGS data) and treatments
  • Link experts in microbial genomics and metagenomics bioinformatics analysis with clinicians, microbiologists, and subject samples
  • Train clinicians and scientists in the basic principles of microbial genomics and study design

(PMC4177058) Human virome in five body habitats

Cytomegalovirus

(PMC4054670) Bacterial genera accumulation curve

Wuchereria bancrofti

(PMC4164201) Biosynthetic Gene Clusters

(PMC3573124) Drug interactions with kinase groups

(PMC4073010) Community class PCoA

Candida albicans

(PMC4151715) Bacterial class abundance over time

(PMC4054670) Shannon diversity comparison across 22 habitats
These activities enable Washington University to maintain its position as a leader in the field of Genomics of Microbial Systems; they also enable clinical, translational and basic science researchers to explore understudied aspects of infectious diseases, host-microbe interactions and variations in the human microbiome in health and disease. The Center supports basic, translational, and clinical research. CC-GEMS projects facilitate development of new therapeutics and diagnostics for infections and other microbially-driven conditions.

Upcoming Seminars:

Recent Publications:

Infectious Diseases Genomics Seminar
Friday December 9th 2016 @ 12:00pm
  
Eldin Jasarevic, PhD
(Center for Host-Microbial Interactions, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Pennsylvania)
Transmission of stress signals: Neurodevelopmental programming through host-microbe interactions
  

Large Conference Room
Rm. 4134/4135 MGI
4444 Forest Park Blvd.

Lunch is provided
(RSVP to: ghaida@dom.wustl.edu)
Pion SDS, Chesnais CB, Weil GJ, Fischer PU, Missamou F, Boussinesq M. Effect of 3 years of biannual mass drug administration with albendazole on lymphatic filariasis and soil-transmitted helminth infections: a community-based study in Republic of the Congo. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 Jul;17(7):763-769. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30175-5. Epub 2017 Mar 31. PubMed PMID: 28372977.

Amadi B, Besa E, Zyambo K, Kaonga P, Louis-Auguste J, Chandwe K, Tarr PI, Denno DM, Nataro JP, Faubion W, Sailer A, Yeruva S, Brantner T, Murray J, Prendergast AJ, Turner JR, Kelly P. Impaired Barrier Function and Autoantibody Generation in Malnutrition Enteropathy in Zambia. EBioMedicine. 2017 Jul 19. pii: S2352-3964(17)30290-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.07.017. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28750860.

Freedman SB, Xie J, Nettel-Aguirre A, Lee B, Chui L, Pang XL, Zhuo R, Parsons B, Dickinson JA, Vanderkooi OG, Ali S, Osterreicher L, Lowerison K, Tarr PI; Alberta Provincial Pediatric EnTeric Infection TEam (APPETITE). Enteropathogen detection in children with diarrhoea, or vomiting, or both, comparing rectal flocked swabs with stool specimens: an outpatient cohort study. Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Jul 13. pii: S2468-1253(17)30160-7. doi: 10.1016/S2468-1253(17)30160-7. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28712662.

Pittman JE, Wylie KM, Akers K, Storch GA, Hatch J, Quante J, Frayman KB, Clarke N, Davis M, Stick SM, Hall GL, Montgomery G, Ranganathan S, Davis SD, Ferkol TW; AREST CF. Association of Antibiotics, Airway Microbiome and Inflammation in Infants with Cystic Fibrosis. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2017 Jul 14. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201702-121OC. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28708417.

 
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  CC-GEMS v1.0           Copyright Statement 
The Genome Institute Washington University School of Medicine, Dept. of Medicine  Washington University School of Medicine, Dept. of Pediatrics  Washington University in St. Louis